• A Modest Proposal REDUX

    Pages: 3

    This is a 3 page paper that provides an overview of the bicameral political system in the US. A satirical suggestion is made in the style of Swift for fixing problems associated therewith. Bibliography lists 0 sources.

    File: KW60_KFmodpro.doc

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    listed below. Citation styles constantly change, and these examples may not contain the most recent updates. A Modest Proposal REDUX , 1/2011 --for more  information on using this paper properly! In recent years, a great deal of criticism has been levied at the bicameral system that dominates American politics. Conventional wisdom has held  that there are truly only two political parties in the country with realistic chances to occupy the seats of government through democratic election: the Republican party and the Democratic party.  Voting for a third party in elections is popularly known as "throwing ones vote away". Some have argued that, in the 21st century, the inherent dualism in the bicameral system  has devolved into a state of caustic vote-wrangling in which each side uses the power of mass media to present the other side as dangerous, violent, ill-informed, and damned by  the higher powers. Accordingly, there have been calls for the vitriol in the modern political system to be dampened by toning down political rhetoric, dialing back the intensity of "pundit"  newscasters, and focusing on legitimate journalistic practices such as objectively reporting the facts of stories of interest. Any good American, however, realizes that this solution has one major drawback: reasonable,  human-centric debate of the issues that practically effect the quality of life on earth is likely to undermine the virulent biases and systems of oppression on which capitalism and democracy  depend. This paper presents, therefore, a proposal for addressing the concerns of too much emotional bickering and lack of focus in politics. To begin with, one must look at  how political personalities are formed. In general, children in the United States attend public schools, where they learn (among other things) about American history and the structure of the political 

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