• Addiction and J.R.R. Tolkien’s TheFellowship of the Ring

    Pages: 12

    In twelve pages this paper examines the coveting of the ring by the characters of J.R.R. Tolkien’s The Fellowship of the Ring for power from the perspective of addiction. Six sources are listed in the bibliography.

    File: TG15_TGfraddict.rtf

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    and getting the most gratification out of life as possible. After all, it is a journey that is undertaken once. However, as the old saying goes, Too much  of a good thing is too much of a good thing. Sometimes, the source of occasional pleasure is no longer enough; the activity must be increased in order to  maximize the positive feelings it generates. When the substance or object of enjoyment becomes an obsession without which everyday life becomes intolerable, the behavior evolves from a normal motivation  to seek happiness into an addiction. A psychological definition of addiction typically reads, an "increased tolerance to a drug, physical and psychological dependence, and withdrawal symptoms when administration of  the drug is stopped" (qtd. in Foster). According to Johns Hopkins Medical Institutes Chief of Behavioral Psychology Dr. Michael F. Cataldo, addiction is a single term that represents a wide  range of problems associated with dependency (Rodgers 32). Individuals can become addicted to substances such as drugs or alcohol, adrenaline rushes achieved through speed or potentially life-threatening physical activities,  Internet and computers, power, or greed. For those who seek power or riches, no amount is ever enough to satisfy the need. It grows along with the addiction  to the power source. Addictions are as unique as are individuals, and therefore the effects can vary from one to the other (Rodgers 32). Nevertheless, according to medical  experts, any type of addiction usually displays the same characteristics, which include: * The source triggering the addiction evokes pleasure and mood swings; * The development of physical tolerance  to the source requiring an intake of larger amounts to duplicate or increase its effects; * Physical and psychological dependence or craving, which when the source is removed generates 

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