• Ann Hutchinson, Cotton Mather, Jonathan Edwards

    Pages: 10

    This 10 page paper presents a hypothetical dialog between and among the three persons in the title. For instance, Hutchinson was banished from Massachusetts because of her radical ideas about gender equality. All three were influential in the history of religion in America. The topic is whether or not the church should ordain homosexuals. The essay begins with a brief background of each of the three. The essay then launches into the dialog that might occur. The writer also notes which of the three might be more accepting of the proposal. The reader must suspend logic regarding time periods (for example, Hutchinson was dead before Mather was born) and simply focus on what a discussion among these three luminaries might sound like. Bibliography lists 8 sources.

    File: MM12_PGdilg.rtf

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    should ordain homosexuals. The essay begins with a brief background of each of the three. The essay then launches into the dialog that might occur. The writer also notes which  of the three might be more accepting of the proposal. The reader must suspend logic regarding time periods (for example, Hutchinson was dead before Mather was born) and simply focus  on what a discussion among these three luminaries might sound like. Bibliography lists 8 sources. PGdilg.rtf ANN HUTCHINSON, COTTON MATHER, JONATHAN EDWARDS , January 2003  properly! Scenario This essay presents a hypothetical dialog among Jonathan Edwards, Ann Hutchinson and Cotton Mather. The topic of  their dialog is whether or not homosexuals should be allowed to be ordained as preachers/ministers. A Little Background First, a little background on each of the three  speakers. Anne Hutchinson (1591 - 1643) was born as Anne Marbury in Alford, England (Buckingham, 1995). Her father, Francis Marbury, a deacon at Christ Church, Cambridge, was a rebel  who spoke out against the practices of the clergy of the Church of England and spent a year in jail because of this criticisms (Buckingham, 1995). Being raised in this  environment and having access to her fathers religious books shaped Ann Hutchinsons personality as an independent thinker (Buckingham, 1995). Ann married at age 21 and was drawn to minister named  John Cotton, with the family traveling each week to hear Cotton preach (Buckingham, 1995). Ann adopted the Puritan views of religion and after 20 years, she and her family, now  with 15 children, followed Cotton to New England where Ann believed she would be free to express her own religious views (Buckingham, 1995). She continued studying the Bible and eventually 

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