• Case Study : Bolman And Deal

    Pages: 5

    This 5 page paper uses Bolman and Deal's Four Frame Analysis to discuss a case study involving the U.S. Forest Service. Specifically, the writer uses two frameworks: the Political Framework and the Human Resource Framework. The scenario is that a pilot program decentralized control but site administrators were not told that a certain pot of money had to be used exclusively for one specific program. A manager leaked this fact to the media and was subsequently transferred involuntarily and is alleging the transfer is unconstitutional. The question is how the manager needs to respond if called before a congressional hearing. Bibliography lists 2 sources.

    File: MM12_PGusfrst.rtf

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    Sample Text:
    CASE STUDY : BOLMAN AND DEAL , properly! [Note: Since book cited is  not available to us, the student will need to reference page numbers as appropriate.] Case Study: The U.S. Forest Service Champions: Bottom-up Management Analyzing this case using the human  resource and the political frames from Bolman and Deals Four-Frame Analysis, we find first that Dale Robertsons pilot program followed along the principles of the human resource framework. According to  Bolman and Deal, the Human Resource Framework: * Puts people first (Bolman and Deal 1991, p. 15). * Is based on the premise that people are the center, the core,  the heart of the organization (Bolman and Deal 1991, p. 15). * Provides the people the resources they need (Bolman and Deal 1991, p. 15). * Empowers employees through their  participation in decision making (Bolman and Deal 1991, p. 15). Robertson did all of these. He removed bureaucratic barriers and gave autonomy to site administrators to do what was best  for that site. This included moving money from one budgetary category to another. The pilot program was immensely successful with significant gains productivity and cooperation. In fact, there was  an 18 percent gain in productivity. Furthermore, morale within the ranks was greatly enhanced. What happened next is typical of bureaucracies. Through a series of events, Congress dramatically increased  the budget for wilderness management, one component in the forest service responsibilities. These funds were to be used exclusively for wilderness management and not for such things as campground maintenance,  campground improvements, etc. However, that word did not get passed clearly to the site administrators. Then, a disgruntled employee, a manager, Jane Doe, in the wilderness program, leaked to 

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