• Changes in the Land: Indians, Colonists, and the Ecology of New England": A Review of the Book by William Cronan

    Pages: 4

    A 4 page overview of the major points presented by this ethnohistorian. Cronan contends that The Native American inhabitants of New England at the point of European colonization viewed the land in a much different manner than did the colonist. They utilized its resources, of course, but they utilized those resources only for the purposes of their own sustenance. The colonists, in contrast, were intent on using the land not just for their own needs but for economic profit. No additional sources are listed.

    File: AM2_PPcolEnv.rtf

    Send Me This Paper »

     

    Sample Text:
    Changes in the Land: Indians, Colonists, and the Ecology of New England": A Review of the Book by William Cronan  by 15 Dec 2004 paper properly!  William Cronans "Changes in the Land: Indians, Colonists, and the Ecology of New  England", as its name would imply, offers a detailed examination of the ecology of New England and how that ecology was impacted over time by the Native Americans and the  European colonists that ultimately settled there. This book offers both an excellent history lesson and an unsurpassed environmental treatise. The  land that we would come to call New England had many changes in store for it once the European colonists arrived there. While Native Americans had inhabited the area  for centuries, they had made few large-scale environmental impacts there. The Native Americans viewed the land in a much different manner than did the colonist. They utilized its  resources, of course, but they utilized those resources only for the purposes of their own sustenance. The colonists, in contrast, were intent on using the land not just for  their own needs but for economic profit. The were in search of merchantable commodities, commodities that could be harvested and shipped back to England for profit.  The colonists approached New England from a capitalistic stance, a stance that included detailed assessments of its resources and the potential value of those 

    Back to Results