• Research Paper on:
    ESL in Puerto Rico & Spain

    Number of Pages: 11

     

    Summary of the research paper:

    A 11 page research paper that focuses on why Puerto Rican ESL instruction has not succeeded, comparing it with Spain. This research investigates the question of why students in one Spanish-speaking country, i.e., Spain, learn English readily and why another Spanish-speaking culture, i.e., Puerto Rico, finds this task problematic and controversial. The writer also looks briefly at ESL methodology in both countries. Bibliography lists 7 sources.

    Name of Research Paper File: D0_kheslpr.rtf

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    Unformatted Sample Text from the Research Paper:
    as Spain, ESL instruction is not only offered in public school, but has turned into a booming business. In many countries, as much as 80 percent of the population understands  and uses English. Yet, in Puerto Rico, despite the fact that English has been taught in the public schools for the last fifty years, English-speaking Puerto Ricans are still rare.  The following research investigates the question of why students in one Spanish-speaking country, i.e., Spain, learn English readily and why another Spanish-speaking culture, i.e., Puerto Rico, finds this task problematic  and controversial. Spain ESL Methodology : The school system in Spain is quite different from that of the US. It is more rigorous and traditional, with a strong emphasis  on memorization of information and little attention paid to personal development (Black 20). The teacher is central in the classroom and students are expected to be little more than "passive  note takers" (Black 20). Developing a teaching approach that encompasses American ESL methodology, yet fits with the culture of Spain has proven to be a challenge, but one that the  Instituto de Estudios Nortamericanos (IEN) in Barcelona, Spain has succeeded in meeting (Black 20). The IEN hires American teachers, but also requires that they take a training course specifically  designed for English as a foreign language students (EFL), that is, students learning English in as non-native environment. Black explains how ESL/EFL theory in the US has argued again explicit  training in regards to grammar; however, Black argues that this is inappropriate to the EFL environment of Spain, where students expect teachers to provide correct structure instruction. At IEN, students  are immersed in a rich environment in order to "learn what good English looks and sounds like" (Black 20). They are provided with the rules of English, and given opportunities 

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