• Future Energy Demands

    Pages: 6

    6 pages in length. In the not-too-distant future -- with regard to history's timeline -- there will come a point when fossil fuels will have been depleted and humans will be forced to find alternative sources with which to power automobiles, household heating units and myriad other machinery that utilizes fuel. However, waiting until supplies are exhausted before establishing a workable alternative would place a major hardship upon future energy demands. For this reason, various options -- not only those that supply a form of fuel but also those that reduce and often eliminate pollution -- have been in the works for several years. The writer discusses the issue of future energy demands and potential fuel alternatives. Bibliography lists 6 sources.

    File: LM1_TLCFutEnerg.rtf

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    FUTURE ENERGY DEMANDS By , (c) September 1998 In the not-too-distant future -- with regard  to historys timeline -- there will come a point when fossil fuels will have been depleted and humans will be forced to find alternative sources with which to power automobiles,  household heating units and myriad other machinery that utilizes fuel. However, waiting until supplies are exhausted before establishing a workable alternative would place a major hardship upon future energy  demands. For this reason, various options -- not only those that supply a form of fuel but also those that reduce and often eliminate pollution -- have been in  the works for several years. It is imperative that these alternatives be implemented long before the current supply is depleted. Without question,  the worlds energy demand has increased due directly to the fact that the population continues to rise. What this translates to in correlating statistics is that energy demands throughout  the past half century have tripled, the global economy has quintupled and the world population increased twofold (Anonymous em_txt4.html). (FIGURE 1)    (figure 1) Richard Cromwell, general manager of SunLine Transit Agency in Southern Californias  Coachella Valley, is a firsthand proponent of alternative fueling. Having to smell the awful odor emitted day after day from his fleet of forty-seven buses, Cromwell (Silverstein 10) encourages 

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