• George W. Bush: An Imperial President

    Pages: 8

    8 pages in length. Defining the relationship that exists between political power and wartime policies is a task that draws its conclusion upon a very fine line. Indeed, while both of these entities have something significant to do with one another, at the same time they each possess their own particular arrangement amidst the wide and varied scheme of bureaucratic function. It can readily be argued that policy needs the combination of power and government in order to enact any level of politics; however, it can also be contended that there does not necessarily have to exist any sort of democratic considerations as a means by which to operate that government. Examining the elements that have brought George W. Bush's presidency to the level of imperial power at which it now resides helps one to gain a significantly better perspective upon what powers Congress upholds under the Constitution and what authority it has relinquished to the Executive Branch. Bibliography lists 10 sources.

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    GEORGE W. BUSH: AN IMPERIAL PRESIDENT by (c) paper properly! I. INTRODUCTION  Defining the relationship that exists between political power and wartime policies is a task that draws its conclusion upon a very fine line.  Indeed, while both of these entities have something significant to do with one another, at the same time they each possess their own particular arrangement amidst the wide and  varied scheme of bureaucratic function. It can readily be argued that policy needs the combination of power and government in order to enact any level of politics; however, it  can also be contended that there does not necessarily have to exist any sort of democratic considerations as a means by which to operate that government. Examining the elements  that have brought George W. Bushs presidency to the level of imperial power at which it now resides helps one to gain a significantly better perspective upon what powers Congress  upholds under the Constitution and what authority it has relinquished to the Executive Branch. II. CONGRESS AND THE PRESIDENT: SHARED IMPERIALISM The extent to which Bush is an Imperialist  president is more clearly understood when the student realizes that historically, Congress has played a significant role in the overall presence of Imperialism. Unknown to many is the fact  that Congress has created its own Imperial agencies by way of delegating its constitutional power; as such, this allows for Congress to "expand bureaucracy, and thus opportunities for constituent service,  while, at the same time, avoiding any blame" (OKeefe et al PG). Making the president the scapegoat of this political shuffling enables Congress to have a fall guy for 

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