• Musical Education/Performance Anxiety

    Pages: 14

    A 14 page research paper that examines the topic of performance anxiety in music education. The writer argues that one of the many obligations of a music teacher is to aid students in learning to overcome and harness performance anxiety, turning this potential foe into a friend that will aid, rather than harm, the student musician. This examination of performance anxiety, first of all, looks at how this problem is defined, and then explores strategies and methodologies that a music teacher can employ that can aid students from a constructivist theoretical standpoint. Bibliography lists 5 sources.

    File: D0_khperanx.rtf

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    Sample Text:
    performance, this problem is particularly relevant to student musicians, as performance is at the heart of music instruction and evaluation. Many times, student musicians are not able to perform to  the best of their ability due to increased performance anxiety. While some professional performers believe that anxiety is a necessary component for offering a superlative performance, anxiety also has the  capability of being able to debilitate the performer, in some cases, making it impossible for the student musician to perform at all. Therefore, one of the many obligations of  a music teacher is to aid students in learning to overcome and harness performance anxiety, turning this potential foe into a friend that will aid, rather than harm, the student  musician. The following examination of performance anxiety, first of all, looks at how this problem is defined, and then explores strategies and methodologies that a music teacher can employ that  can aid students from a constructivist theoretical standpoint. Performance anxiety--what it is and its effects If talented music students do not receive the necessary help that they require in  learning to handle performance anxiety, it can have devastating results. For example, Jane is a talented high school student who plays flute in both the high school band and orchestra.  She worked hard and won first chair in both the band and the orchestra; however, when the moment of her first solo performance came, she froze--"her lips started to shake"  and "her trembling hands couldnt hold the flute steady" (Petrovich 24). Ultimately the second flute began to play Janes solo and she hesitantly joined in (Petrovich 24). Jane was so  devastated by this experience that she gave up her plans to continuing studying music at the college level because most conservatories of music require an entrance audition (Petrovich 24). Performance 

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