• Papal Authority

    Pages: 6

    A 6 page paper. This essay discusses Vatican Council I and II and their conclusions regarding papal authority and power. The writer reports the primary purpose for each of these Councils and their declarations regarding the Pope's power and that of the Bishops and on what they base their beliefs and decisions. The writer comments on challenges the Pope faces today in terms of power and authority. Bibliography lists 10 sources.

    File: ME12_PGpopp9.rtf

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    Sample Text:
    January 1959. The Council began on October 11, 1962 and ended on in December 1965 (Mcbrien, 2009). The First Vatican Council opened in 1969 and closed in 1970 under the  papacy of Pius IX (LOsservatore Romano, Weekly Edition, 2000). Like councils before it, Vatican I was held primarily for the purpose of discussing and combating present-day heresies and to discuss  discipline (Mcbrien, 2009). The purpose of Vatican II was dramatically different than any previous council. The primary purpose was to increase "the fervour [sic] and energy of Catholics, to  serve the needs of Christian people" (Christus Rex Org., n.d.). In the opening address, the Pope said, "The greatest concern of the Ecumenical Council is this: that he sacred deposit  of Christian doctrine should be guarded and taught more efficaciously" (Fish Eaters, 2009). Pope John XXIII worked to establish Christian unity and towards the end, the Pope invited leaders of  other Christina religions to observe the Councils debates and discussions (Christus Rex Org., n.d.). Perhaps even more remarkable, the Pope invited women to audit the discussions beginning in 1964 (Christus  Rex Org., n.d.). This Pope would not live to see the conclusion of this Council. Beginning with Vatican I, the councils employed traditional language, i.e., language that would  be found in civil law, that might need to be explained in terms of religious or spiritual meanings. This is particularly true when the Church of the Councils speak of  power in terms of the Pope and Bishops. It is recognized that the Church is operated and run by a group of human beings but they are carrying out Gods  mission (The Holy See, 1993). This is to be viewed "in the sense provided by Jesus maxim on power in order to serve and the Gospel idea of the pastoral 

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