• Pediatric Perioperative/Adolescents

    Pages: 6

    A 6 page research paper that offers a literature review on perioperative nursing interventions for adolescent surgical patients. Many nurses have the impression that dealing with an adolescent should be similar to dealing with an adult. However, research literature concerning perioperative experience with adolescents indicates that there are solid reasons for including adolescent care in the realm of pediatric medicine. This literature review addresses data concerning perioperative management of adolescents and the implication of research data for nursing practice in this area. Bibliography lists 5 sources.

    File: D0_khperiad.rtf

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    Pediatric Perioperative/Adolescents - properly!  Many nurses have the impression that dealing with an adolescent should be similar to dealing with an adult. However, research literature concerning perioperative experience with adolescents indicates that there  are solid reasons for including adolescent care in the realm of pediatric medicine. The following literature review addresses data concerning perioperative management of adolescents and the implication of research data  for nursing practice in this area. It is general perception among many nurses that the brain is largely developed by the time that an individual reaches the teen years.  They have studied the developmental theories of psychologist Jean Piaget who proposes that the ability to think abstractly is achieved between ages 11 and 14 and they know that this  represents the highest level of cognition (Hockenberry, 2003). They attribute fluctuations in adolescent behavior, such as their sometimes seeming inability to follow medical directives, to cascading hormones. This  perception of the adolescent brain has, however, been disputed by empirical research, and, in fact, researchers, such as Spano (2003), argue that the brain is actively developing throughout the teen  years and into young adulthood. Herrman sums up the implications of research toward the field of pediatric nursing by saying that far from functioning in an adult manner, the teen  brain is a "work in progress" (Herrman, 2005, p. 147). Cognitive controls are still "under construction," and nurses should consider this fact when designing a plan of care for  an adolescent client (Wallis, 2004, p. 59). Data on the development of abstract reasoning skills, as well as of the "recognition of costs and rewards of selected health behaviors and 

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