• Power in the Intergovernmental System

    Pages: 5

    Some analysts would claim that power in the recently established intergovernmental system resides with the big states, those with the highest populations and, hence, the most voting power. Others claim the main power in the intergovernmental system resides with those states smart enough to get the most federal monies in the form of block grants by putting in the best applications for those grants. Some say it resides with big business. This paper posits that the power, for the moment, resides with the federal government. Bibliography lists 4 sources. JVintgov.rtf

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    Power in the Intergovernmental System 04/2004 -- for more information on Some analysts would  claim that power in the recently established intergovernmental system resides with the big states, those with the highest populations and, hence, the most voting power. Others claim the main  power in the intergovernmental system resides with those states smart enough to get the most federal monies in the form of block grants by putting in the best applications for  those grants. For anyone of the thousands of jobless Americans who have lost information systems jobs sent overseas to corporations owned by Dick Cheney and other White House business  interests, it would appear that the real power is in the hands of big business. All of these claims have a  solid foundation in probability, but, for the moment, the main power in the intergovernmental system remains the federal government. The student may want  to state the main reason cited for the ongoing federalism in an intergovernmental system is the need for federal-level education in terrorist containment and national security post 9-11. Yet,  this claim may not hold water as the only reason for continued federalism. Sanford F. Schram and Carol S. Weissert provide  that in 1998-1999, the states were given greater powers in regard to social policy and Congress was to continue to control culture and crime. Yet, since that time, Congress  has continued to oversee new areas of social policy, including health privacy. The federal government continues to assert itself into international conflicts and into state policies in matters as 

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