• Research Paper on:
    Proposal: Gender Differences In Science Achievement

    Number of Pages: 14

     

    Summary of the research paper:

    A 14 page paper that presents a proposal for a study to determine gender differences in science achievement in Hong Kong. The stereotype of males performing far better than girls in science has been perpetuated for all time. The literature, however, would suggest that this stereotype is a myth. This paper provides an introduction/literature review, research questions and hypotheses, method for the study, and a discussion of what the investigator would hope to accomplish through the study. Bibliography lists 5 sources.

    Name of Research Paper File: MM12_PGgensci.rtf

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    provides an introduction/literature review, research questions and hypotheses, method for the study, and a discussion of what the investigator would hope to accomplish through the study. Bibliography lists 5 sources.  PGgensci.rtf PROPOSAL: GENDER DIFFERENCES IN SCIENCE ACHIEVEMENT , October, 2001 properly! Introduction There is  a long-held stereotypical premise that girls do not achieve as well in science as boys. There is also a significant amount of research that demonstrates this not necessarily true. Even  so, girls who are interested in science face numerous barriers in pursuing this strand of study. Many of these barriers are erected unintentionally by teachers and parents; some are put  up by girls themselves (Hammrich; Richardson and Livingston, 2000). Research has found that girls and boys enjoy science equally in elementary grades but as they reach adolescence, girls  seem to lose interest in this field of study. This is especially true among girls who are from economically or educationally disadvantaged homes. Girls tend to be steered away from  traditionally dominated fields such as mathematics, technology and science towards areas that are more traditional for females, such as social sciences. The National Science Foundation reported that half of the  people working in social sciences were women but only 8 percent of engineers are women (Hammrich, Richardson and Livingston, 2000). Girls tend to have far less self-esteem in  science than do boys; they think they are just not good in this area. That opinion, however, does not seem to become strong until they reach secondary schools. Hammrich, Richardson  and Livingston stated that "as girls perceive they are not good at these subjects, their sense of self-worth and aspirations for themselves deteriorate . . .research found that both girls 

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