• The Presidency, Congress & Public Opinion

    Pages: 8

    An 8 page research paper that examines the effect of public opinion on the relationship between the Presidency and Congress. Examination of the interplay and relationship between these two branches shows that it is mediated by an outside factor that largely serves to define the boundaries of power for each administration. That factor is public opinion and its effects on the relationship between the presidency and Congress constitutes the focus of this investigation. Bibliography lists 6 sources.

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    The Presidency, Congress & Public Opinion - May, 2005 for more information on  using this paper properly! Introduction The process of public policymaking in the United States is a task that is addressed by both the executive and legislative branches of government,  that is, policy is established by both the Presidency and Congress working in collaboration. The Constitution delegates the responsibility of proposing legislation to the executive branch, while Congress has full  legislative powers. Examination of the interplay and relationship between these two branches shows that it is mediated by an outside factor that largely serves to define the boundaries of power  for each administration. That factor is public opinion and its effects on the relationship between the presidency and Congress constitutes the focus of this investigation. The social scientists that  study public opinion and its effect on public policy agree on the following points pertaining to public opinion in democratic countries. First of all, that "public opinion influences public policy,"  and, secondly, "the more salient an issue to the public, the stronger the relationship is likely to be" (Burnstein, 2003, p. 29). In other words, there is a direction correlation  between the degree to which citizens care about an issue and how likely they are to take elected officials to task over their behavior toward that issue on election day  (Arnold, 1990). As this suggests, public opinion can be a highly influential factor both for the presidency and Congress, often mediating their relationship. Success of the Relationship Whether or  not the relationship between the executive and legislative branches is successful is due, in large part, to a presidents ability to negotiate with members of Congress and work through the 

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