• Writing a Proposal

    Pages: 4

    This 4 page report discusses the key purposes and potential problems associated with proposal writing. Bibliography lists 3 sources.

    File: D0_BWprowrt.rtf

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    Writing a Proposal By: C.B. Rodgers - January 2004 paper properly!  Introduction As with any other sort of effective and meaningful writing, writing a proposal requires, certain unique skills. The process relies on the ability of the writer to communicate well  and to be convincing. The writer must be able to creatively weave his or her purpose into a framework in which a problem or situation is outlined and what they  propose to do about it. The "trick" to writing a proposal that will be responded to with both enthusiasm and support is to blend the right amount of creativity with  well-conceived outline for a project wile still following the necessary guidelines setout by those to whom the proposal is being made. This is as true for making a proposal to  a state agency for a social services program as it is for an advertising agency "pitching" an ad campaign proposal to a client. Regardless of the content of the proposal,  the person pulling it together should be prepared to understand that they will need to clearly present a specific purpose. They should also acknowledge that they will always find  certain problems that must be addressed. Structuring a Proposal The first and essentially most important aspect of a successful proposal is that it has been well thought  out. Costs, problems, opportunities, and benefits all need to be presented in a way that allows the person reviewing the proposal to really catch the vision the writer wants to  present. Shane (2003) recommends that before the writing process even begins, it is important to: "... gather sources of information and conduct a literature review on the topic" (p. 12). 

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