• A Critique of the 2006 - 2011 Indian Health Service Strategic Plan

    Pages: 7

    A 7 page critique of the latest Native American health care strategy implemented by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. This paper points out the primary strengths of this document lies in its focus on accountability and involving Native Americans themselves in the planning and delivery of health care programs. Bibliography lists 3 sources.

    File: AM2_PPnaHlthPlan.rtf

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    Sample Text:
    the U.S. government as part of the rights established by treaties enacted with individual tribal groups early in American history. Initially, of course, history tells us that little in  terms of health care was actually delivered to these people. Fortunately, over time, those health services have improved dramatically. The formation of the Indian Health Service occurred some  fifty years ago and since that time it has been the primary agency involved in the delivery of Native American health services. The particulars of that delivery are detailed in  a variety of documents, the most notable of which is The "2006 - 2011 Indian Health Service Strategic Plan", a revision of the "2003 IHS Strategic Plan". This plan  has been drafted thanks to the work of the Indian Health Services Strategic Planning Workgroup, a workgroup that encompasses not just non-Native governmental planners but also a diversity of Indian  health stakeholders that is inclusive of Native Americans themselves. Perhaps one of the most interesting points presented in the 2006 - 2011 Strategic Plan is the hope that is  projected for future improvements in health care provision that can be credited with the growing tendency for Native American tribes to assume the management of health care programs that affect  them. The 2006 - 2011 Strategic Plan not only focuses on performance of health care delivery but also on accountability for that delivery.  Accountability, of course, should be considered an integral component of all aspects of health care. Hunt (2001) emphasizes that embracing accountability entails using an individuals and an organizations  knowledge and experience to challenge "what is wrong in health care make a real difference to practice and carry it forward to improve on it". While accountability varies within 

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