• Hunter's "Race, Gender, And The Politics Of Skin Tone" - Methodological Review

    Pages: 6

    6 pages in length. Hunter's (2005) book examines both the subtle and obvious consequences of being a woman with darker skin in a lighter-skinned society. Utilizing several methods to gather her information, the author uncovers some expected - as well as unanticipated - insight gleaned from her research. Hunter (2005) utilizes a mixture of qualitative and quantitative methodologies such as national surveys, cultural criticism and personal interviews depending upon the chapter, which provides an interdisciplinary glance into what has come to be regarded as colorism. Findings illustrate the discrimination toward African American and Mexican American that result in compromised education, income and socioeconomic rank of spouse, which is significantly tied into the concept of beauty. Bibliography lists 3 sources.

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    her information, the author uncovers some expected - as well as unanticipated - insight gleaned from her research. Hunter (2005) utilizes a mixture of qualitative and quantitative methodologies such  as national surveys, cultural criticism and personal interviews depending upon the chapter, which provides an interdisciplinary glance into what has come to be regarded as colorism. Findings illustrate the  discrimination toward African American and Mexican American that result in compromised education, income and socioeconomic rank of spouse, which is significantly tied into the concept of beauty. Beauty is  typically defined in the United States, and increasingly around the world, by whiteness and Western-European features...Although the overt racial standards of beauty are often unspoken, people across ethnic groups and  class levels tend to agree about who possesses beauty and who does not. Because beauty is a racist construct many women of color are not viewed as beautiful by  mainstream society and thus do not possess beauty as a form of capital (Hunter, 2005, p. 27). Based upon Lincoln et al (1985) and Creswells (1997) description of various  theoretical paradigms, this study fits equally well with both. Inasmuch as qualitative processes are the key to each book and a pertinent part of Hunters (2005) methodology, it serves  to illustrate the point each author is making about extracting data based upon a more humanly tangible level than with its quantitative counterpart. Indeed, Hunter does employ the quantitative  approach in some chapters of her book, however, this methodology does not fit anywhere into the examinations provided by Lincoln et al (1985) and Creswell (1997). Hard science may not  be up to the challenge posed by another methodology that goes by many names, not the least of which includes humanistic, subjective, ethnographic, hermeneutic, case study, phenomenological and qualitative (Lincoln 

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