• Parallels Between The Peloponnesian And Cold Wars

    Pages: 5

    5 pages in length. No matter the time period, participants or locale, one can analyze any two historical wars and come to the conclusion that their respective reasons were based upon a common denominator of issues, not the least of which is that of power. Defining the parallels that exist between the Peloponnesian and Cold Wars is a task that draws its conclusion upon a very fine line; indeed, while each of these important events have many significant things to do with the another, at the same time they each possess their own particular arrangement within the wide and varied scheme of man's constant quest for power. Bibliography lists 3 sources.

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    not the least of which is that of power. Defining the parallels that exist between the Peloponnesian and Cold Wars is a task that draws its conclusion upon a  very fine line; indeed, while each of these important events have many significant things to do with the another, at the same time they each possess their own particular arrangement  within the wide and varied scheme of mans constant quest for power. The East and West were faced with equally frustrating challenges that  ultimately surfaced and resurfaced again without previous resolve. After having just exited out of one battle, the "war-weary" (Diplomatic Telegrams) opposing forces were now to be thrust into yet  another. In an attempt to restructure their ultimate direction, as well as their inherent focus upon retaliation, both sides "desperately sought explanations" (Diplomatic Telegrams). Ascertaining the reasons behind  the revived hostility that instigated the Cold War, historians have come to acknowledge the presence of Russian suspicions and American paranoia as fundamental motives. Delving deeper into these particular  considerations finds that the Russians were, in fact, a nation of insecure people trying to assert their political independence. It can be argued that insecurity has been "one fundamental  factor affecting Soviet policy" (Diplomatic Telegrams) since the beginnings of the Muscovite State. In exchange, the Americans were guilty of accusing Soviet power as being "impervious to logic of  reason, and highly sensitive to logic of force" (Diplomatic Telegrams), an allegation that is not only confirmed by Cold War occurrences but also by historical considerations, as well. When  one contemplates the rise and fall of the Cold War, there exist a number of variables that must be addressed in order to gain a comprehensive understanding. Depending upon 

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