• Powerful And Rich Countries: Do They Create Governmental Corruption In Third World Nations Or Merely Exacerbate Existing Practices?

    Pages: 10

    10 pages in length. Power, in general, is not necessarily threatening when employed as a means by which to provide accepted global boundaries; however, it is when those boundaries are overstepped that power must adopt a more threatening countenance. The very nature of globalization has rendered the notion of power a casualty of unsavory political activities within Third World countries. Defining the relationships that exist between political power and international relations is a task that draws its conclusion upon a very fine line. Indeed, while both of these entities have something significant to do with one another, at the same time the significance is that they each possess their own particular arrangement within the wide and varied scheme of bureaucratic function. It can readily be argued that one needs the combination of power and government in order to enact any level of politics; however, it can also be contended that there does not necessarily have to exist any sort of democratic considerations as a means by which to operate that government. This specific point speaks to the concept of power, authoritarianism and Third World corruption as it existed during the Cold War. Bibliography lists 8 sources.

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    employed as a means by which to provide accepted global boundaries; however, it is when those boundaries are overstepped that power must adopt a more threatening countenance. Implied by  John Baylis and Steve Smiths The Globalization of World Politics: An Introduction to International Relations is the fact that the very nature of globalization has rendered the notion of power  a casualty of unsavory political activities within Third World countries.1 Defining the relationships that exist between political power and international relations is a task that draws its conclusion upon  a very fine line. Indeed, while both of these entities have something significant to do with one another, at the same time the significance is that they each possess  their own particular arrangement within the wide and varied scheme of bureaucratic function. It can readily be argued that one needs the combination of power and government in order  to enact any level of politics; however, it can also be contended that there does not necessarily have to exist any sort of democratic considerations as a means by which  to operate that government. This specific point speaks to the concept of power, authoritarianism and Third World corruption as it existed during the Cold War. "With the onslaught  of the Cold War, the Third World became an unfortunate battleground of economic ideals as put forth by the worlds reigning superpowers. The First World, with the U.S.A. leading  the charge, escalated its policy of capitalistic vampirism vis-?-vis the Third World. The world was split into two camps: those who basked in the glory of democratic institutions, and  the others who struggled to create them. Enter corruption. In the post-Cold War 1990s, the definition of Third World began to turn away from questions of governmental financial 

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