• Research Paper on:
    Proposal for Researching Visual Illusion

    Number of Pages: 7

     

    Summary of the research paper:

    A 7 page proposal for conducting a study in visual illusion. The purpose here is to propose a research study that can inform how much repetition is required in the process of making such adjustments in perception, beginning with perceived object size. The researcher anticipates that observed results will be more accurate through (1) ensuring homogeneity of vision ability and (2) informing participants at the outset that they can make as many attempts as necessary to reach the point at which their estimates of disk size matches reality. The results should be useful in informing how individuals reconcile perception and fact. Bibliography lists 5 sources.

    Name of Research Paper File: CC6_KSpsycResIllus.rtf

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    an enormous role in forming the perceptions formed in the mind. A person whose eyesight has been changing gradually over a long period of time may report on first  wearing the glasses prescribed that the prescription must be wrong? Objects that the individual "knows" are close at hand - close enough to pick up - seem to be  much further away and very much smaller. The eyeglass wearer eventually becomes accustomed to the change in perception, to the point that it is the view through the glasses  that the individual perceives as being normal, rather than the distorted view s/he had been living with before acquiring glasses. In the period  of adjustment to the new perceptions of virtually everything within arms reach, the individual is likely to knock over a coffee cup rather than grasp its handle as intended, or  over-reach to miss a target object. Illusion can have the same effect, also requiring that the individual adjust physical movements to achieve visually-based goals.  The purpose here is to propose a research study that can inform how much repetition is required in the process of making such adjustments in perception, beginning with  perceived object size. Literature Review There is evidence of pathways linking visual perception of an object and mental determinations of its nature.  J. Randall Flanagan and Michael A. Beltzner of Queens University in Kingston, Ontario conducted a size-weight visual perception study using 40 study participants and two square boxes with handles.  The boxes were identical in weight (0.39 kilograms), but "One box measured 5.2 centimeters on each edge; the other, 10.9 cm" (Bennett, 2000; p. 407). After picking up the 

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