• The Nature Of Revolution

    Pages: 5

    5 pages in length. Revolutions – the fundamental change in political organization as with a an overthrow or rebellion -- have been occurring virtually since the beginning of time. There has been no point in history where there was not some kind of conflict brewing among power hungry leaders that would either result in the overwhelming loss of human life or the takeover of innocent people for their land’s wealth. Bibliography lists 5 sources.

    File: LM1_TLCrevlu.doc

    Send Me This Paper »

     

    Sample Text:
    where there was not some kind of conflict brewing among power hungry leaders that would either result in the overwhelming loss of human life or the takeover of innocent people  for their lands wealth. Why is this so? Intolerance is a significant factor among the many reasons countries enter into revolutionary conflicts. Coupled with the fact that  each nation believes it is worthy of more status and power than all others, it is not surprising that the phenomenon of revolutionary conflict continues even today. However, there  exist other, more humane reasons for the nature of revolution, particularly when it breaks a long-standing tradition of autocratic oppression. To be sure, there are some nations that participate in  revolutionary conflicts much more than their other worldly counterparts; it almost appears as though their entire existence is for the benefit of rebellion. Other countries, however, adopt a more  benevolent attitude toward political conflict and effectively abstain from battle whenever possible. Political involvement in revolutionary activities lends itself to the notion that all global conflict is somehow intertwined  with significant political influence. International terrorism would not hold the same appeal if there were not a great deal of bureaucratic interference; rather, the incentive to gain control over  less powerful countries would cease to exist. International terrorism as a method of revolution has turned into a specialized art over the past several decades; the contemporary art of  terrorism stems from "ad hoc conspiracies that grow out of vast but nebulous universes of anger and frustration" (Jenkins, 1997, p. B-9). This frustration has grown over the years  as an offshoot of oppression and a lack of worldwide democracy. The question that remains, however, is why do some countries eagerly participate in revolutionary conflict while others prefer to 

    Back to Results