• The Greatest Powers of the Legislative, Executive and Judicial Branches of Government

    Pages: 4

    This 4 page paper looks at Congressional powers, the powers of the president and the judiciary and discusses each one individually. For each branch of government, its greatest power is discerned. Bibliography lists 5 sources.

    File: RT13_SA310lej.rtf

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    The Greatest Powers of the Legislative, Executive and Judicial Branches of Government - March, 2003 -- for more information on  using this paper properly! The system of checks and balances is probably the most impressive part of the American political structure. It  is a brilliant method of making sure that no one branch of government attains too much power. The president of course has a great deal of power but he cannot  just decide to make a law. There is a procedure. At the same time, while Congress is the law making body of the government, it cannot make a law without  the Presidents approval. Of course, even if a President vetoes a bill, Congress has recourse, and even if a law is passed and put into a effect, a judge can  rule that a law is unconstitutional. Hence, each branch of government has remarkable powers. In reviewing the three branches of government, one may wonder what is the strength of  each of these branches. What are the greatest powers of the Legislative, Executive and Judicial Branches of Government? Each branch, in its own right, does have a multitude of powers,  but it is interesting to try to discern which appears to be the most significant power for each. First, what is the greatest power of Congress? It seems that  Congress has a set of diverse duties and a great many powers. Yet, of all three, Congress is probably the weakest branch. It can propose and make laws and  it can pass laws with a two thirds vote even if the President vetoes a bill, but at first glance, it would appear that it is weaker than the president 

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