• The Run for the White House

    Pages: 3

    This 3 page paper looks at the power of the people and of the media as it respects presidential primaries and general elections. Recommendations are made in terms of problems faced in this area. Bibliography lists 4 sources.

    File: RT13_SA416WH.rtf

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    Sample Text:
    The Run for the White House - April, 2004 paper properly!  Perhaps the biggest problem in nominating a presidential candidate is how to choose one who has a good chance of winning the presidency in November.  In this evolved two party system, it seems that either of two candidates will certainly win. Few third party candidates have made a significant dent, although there is hope for  other parties in the future perhaps. Hence, the largest problem is to choose a candidate who the people will vote for overwhelmingly. This is generally accomplished by choosing a moderate  candidate. For example, when Howard Dean showed too much enthusiasm he was bashed by the media and essentially pushed out of the race. In terms of nominations, the people really  hold the power in the system because they are the ones who vote for the candidates. The process begins in February when the first primary is effected. That is  in New Hampshire. As the handful of candidates launch a national campaign, they one by one drop out because they lose in various states along the way. Gregg (1997) says:  "New Hampshire serves the nation by winnowing the weak sisters before the key races begin in the other states." For presidential candidates, the election campaign obviously begins  a long time before the national vote ("The race," 1996). There are fifty primaries and people who are registered members of the two main parties are able to vote  in these races (1996). In some states, non-registered members can vote too. In general, the strategy for presidential candidates is to acquire as many of their supporters as feasible and 

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